Capitol Hill Shooting Reminds Us How Important Postpartum Depression Treatment Is

Photo: Shutterstock / The Bump Photo: Shutterstock / The Bump

Yesterday, news broke that a high-speed chase had taken place on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., amidst the government shutdown. The driver of the car, identified later as Miriam Carey, was 34-years-old and was mom to one-year-old daughter, Ericka. Miriam was a dental hygienist from Connecticut. After driving directly into a gate in front of the White House with her daughter in the car, Miriam was chased down Pennsylvania Avenue and stopped in front of the Capitol.

After her identification had been released, her mother, Idella Carey, came forward to speak about her daughter. “She had postpartum depression after having the baby. A few months later, she got sick. She was depressed… She was hospitalized.” And though Miriam had “no history of violence”, her mom and other close loved ones were admittedly at a loss for why Miriam and Erica had traveled so far from Connecticut to the nation’s capital. Idella had believed that the two were off to a doctor’s appointment. Miriam’s boss said in a statement, “I would never in a million years believe that she would do something like this. It’s the furthest thing from anything I would think she would do, especially with her child in the car. I am floored that it would be her.”

During the chase, two police officers were injured. Miriam was shot and killed by police after driving “very erratically and very dangerously.”

The heartbreaking news hits home for mothers suffering from postpartum depression and also sheds light on the importance of seeking help if you’re feeling the baby blues or battling PPD. There is no shame — and should be no embarrassment — for moms who feel that they need help navigating the first months of motherhood.

At The Bump, we want all moms to know feel comfortable coming forward and talking about their pre- and postnatal struggles. Our community boards are a safe, respectful place where mothers can get advice, tips and even vent to other moms across the country on the highs and lows of being a new or veteran parent. It’s important to remember that you’re not alone and that you should never feel alone.

For further information on postpartum depression and the baby blues, check out:

Postpartum Depression

When Does Postpartum Depression Start? And How Do I Know If I’m at Risk?

Baby Blues or Postpartum Depression?

Why You Hate Your Husband (After Baby Arrives)

Melissa Rycroft Opens Up About Postpartum Depression

And for details on the postpartum recovery experience, visit our Postpartum Recovery.